U.S. Government Moves to stop Huawei from producing 5G

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Trump’s administration has requested that American allies ban China’s Huawei and other Chinese tech firms that want to produce 5G.

The US government believes that the 5G or fifth generation would give its producers an edge in the military, economic and political sectors, a feat that many countries including the U.S desire. The New York Times reports that the economic battle between China and the U.S makes it even more difficult for the later to give the former its support.

Huawei and other tech firms in China who are looking to build ultra-high speed internet for the next generation have become victims of the ongoing trade tension between China and the U.S.

The U.S is pushing its Diplomatic allies such as Germany, Britain, and Poland to stop tech companies in China from developing 5G, says the Times. This has led to increased international pressure on Huawei about the security of its technology.

In 2012, the U.S government prohibited Huawei from selling equipment in the country, stating security concerns as the reason for their action. The U.S alleged that equipment made in China could allow the Chinese government to gain access into U.S. networks.

Reacting to the allegations, Huawei said they haven’t produced any equipment that will jeopardize the U.S security. Trump, however, doesn’t believe their claims as he is said to be considering an executive order to ban the use of Huawei and ZTE telecommunications equipment in U.S. companies. These companies are China’s biggest network equipment firms.

The 5G network is designed to allow more than one device to connect to one internet source at the same time. The 5G standard has faster device communications and data transfers that previous versions. China has warned that barring Huawei could hamper 5G development in the global telecommunication industry.
Trump’s fight against Huawei is coming at a time when the U.S and China are working to resolve their differences.

Ronak Desai

I am an Associate at the Lakshmi Mittal South Asia Institute at Harvard University. My scholarship focuses on US-India relations, corruption, global governance, and the Indian American Diaspora. I am also a Washington D.C.-based attorney, and have worked extensively in both the public and private sectors. Full bio

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